“We’ve been homeless for six months and my 9th baby is due any day now” -Kidspot

Pregnant 8-year-old mum from WA reveals how she has been homeless for an unbearable six months.

It’s late afternoon and a heavily pregnant Krystal sits in a motel room with her eight children and her partner, desperately appealing to charities for food and a place to sleep before she ends up in again on the street the next morning.

At 32 weeks pregnant, the 35-year-old is terrified that her ninth baby could arrive any day without knowing where she will put him to sleep when he is born.

That sorry feeling of homelessness has been sitting in the pit of the Western Australian mother’s stomach since June last year, when the house she had rented for 13 months was sold.

“It is now a hopeless situation. I am about to have a baby. Where am I going to take her? I do not know. Where am I going to put him to sleep? I don’t know…” Krystal said anxiously to Kidspot.

“Over the next seven weeks, we have to find a place to go where we can get the baby home where he is safe.

“I’ve never been so scared in my life for myself and my family – this baby shouldn’t have to grow up in an environment like this.”

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WA’s mum is terrified her 9th baby could come any day with nowhere to sleep. Source: Provided to Kidspot

“We had to camp or plant in a park because we had nowhere to go”

The family have been caught up in the rental crisis affecting WA and, without a car, often spend hours a day dragging their suitcases and the children, aged between 17 and 2, trying to find a bed for the night.

Despite having an exemplary rental record and visiting around 20 homes a day, they line up with up to 30 other families, all in the same boat, to view a rental home.

“I push strollers for hours a day just trying to find a place to lay our heads. It’s a daily anguish for me and my partner,” Krystal shares.

“It was tough. We go from Airbnbs wondering if we’re going to be on the street.

“There were many times when we had to camp or crash in a park because we had nowhere to go.”

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“I push strollers for hours a day just trying to find a place to lay our heads. It’s a daily anguish for me and my partner.” Source: Provided to Kidspot

“We find ourselves on the street with no food and nowhere to go…”

Krystal’s partner, Wayne, tries to find work after his asbestos business closes.

The 48-year-old now relies on a Job Seeker’s Allowance of $500 a fortnight, while Krystal receives about $680 a week in Child Benefit.

Since losing their rental home, the desperate family has had to move between Airbnbs, motels and trailer parks.

But with most places costing around $1,000 for three to four nights, on day four they find themselves broke.

“We end up on the streets with no food and nowhere to go after about the third or fourth day or borrow money from family and friends until our next payday,” Krystal explains.

“We are constantly late, paying people back and then trying to find a place to sleep and keep the kids safe.

“There were many times when we had to camp under a tarp and sleep on blankets, or camp in a park because we had nowhere to go.”

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“We had to camp under a tarp and sleep on blankets, or camp in a park because we had nowhere to go.” Source: Provided to Kidspot

“We were forced to sleep on the beach – I feel like a failure”

During the busy Christmas holiday period, things were so bleak that the family of 10 were forced to sleep on the beach as accommodation was either full or overpriced.

They moved to eight different suburbs in seven weeks, including four different hotels in Perth’s CBD – only able to stay in each for a night or two at a time.

Unable to afford to babysit her two oldest children, Taj, 17, and Ella, 15, Krystal has sent them to live in different homes with her mother and sister, which understandably takes a toll on them.

“It’s heartbreaking. I can see my children in pain and sadness, but I physically can’t do anything for them…as a mother you feel like a failure.

Krystal’s other 12-year-old children, twins aged 11, 9, 3 and 2, often miss school in Mandurah because they had to leave the suburbs to find a bed to sleep.

All of their belongings are in storage and they had to give away the beloved family dog ​​and two pet birds.

“The children were devastated. When we left home in June, we all cried. We didn’t know where we were going to go,” she reveals.

“My kids aren’t doing the fun things they should be doing – they’re not having normal childhoods; they take care of things they shouldn’t have to take care of.

Krystal admits the impact on the children is probably greater than they let on, but there are days when their pain spills out.

“It’s hard when the four-year-old says to me, ‘I don’t want to move mum anymore.’ “Why do we have to move? “’I want my own bed Mama’”, she relived.

“We do not manage the purchase of food. We often get a $25 voucher for the food bank that should last us the whole week or the four days we are in accommodation. But once we leave, we cannot take the food with us.

“We live day to day and eat day to day. Every day is a trying day.”

RELATED: ‘After Being Homeless, We Finally Have a Home’

“It’s hard when the four-year-old says to me, ‘I want my own bed, mum’.” Source: Provided to Kidspot

“There are families sleeping in the streets and parks like us. It’s a pandemic”

Every day brings Krystal closer to the horrific reality of homeless childbirth.

Last week she spent eight days seriously ill in hospital with an infection and doctors have warned her she should stay in bed as her baby is likely to arrive early.

Instead, she desperately calls the Smith or St Vincent De Paul family to beg for food, clothes and schoolbooks for her children.

“We are transmitted from one organization to another. There is not a single person who stays with you. You’re assigned to different organizations… we’re just a number,” Krystal says.

“The government needs to do more – I have seen so many other families like us. There are families sleeping on the streets and in parks like us. This is a pandemic.”

Housing Choices WA Managing Director Natalie Sangalli says Kidspot that last year has seen an increase in the number of people requiring their services for affordable housing.

“The increase in demand has either been because private landlords have increased rent to an amount that is no longer affordable, or because fixed-term leases have been terminated and low-income tenants have no nowhere to go – like this family.”

For homeless support, contact Mission Australia Where The Salvation Army.

Applications for public housing in WA can be made through the Community Housing Department.

She spent 8 days in hospital with an infection and doctors warned her she should stay in bed as her baby is likely to arrive early. Source: Provided to Kidspot

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